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May 2017 02

By Blogbot

This Wednesday, May 3 on SuicideGirls Radio, hosts Nicole Powers and Bradley Suicide will be joined by Court Ordered comic, Eric Freedman.

You can listen – and watch – SuicideGirls Radio live on Wednesday nights from 8 til 9 PM at our state-of-the-art, all digital home on zinna.tv or on our Facebook page via Facebook LIVE!

For updates on all things SG Radio-related, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

About Eric Freedman

Eric Freedman is a stand up comedian and one of the creators of Tomorrow’s Nobody. He has been writing and producing cartoons, sketch comedy, digital series, and more since 2001, helping create the popular cartoon series Tomorrow’s Nobodies while still in High School. His newest cartoon series Court Ordered was recently featured on Funny or Die and The Laugh Factory and stars an amazing cast of comedians. Comedy is Eric’s first love and when he was fifteen, instead of just playing with his dick all the time, he started writing jokes about it. Currently he tours the world with the band Sublime With Rome as their Road Manager, performs stand up all over the country, and can be seen in the offices of many powerful Hollywood Executives being told “No”.

For more on Eric Freedman visit:

ericjfreedman.com
facebook.com/ericfreedmancomic/
instagram.com/ericjfreedman/
twitter.com/ericjfreedman
youtube.com/user/TomorrowsNobodycom

550_Mangria

The World’s Leading BYOB Radio Show Is Sponsored By Mangria

“As a nightly consumer of red wine, I was shocked one evening to find I had just half a glass left in the bottle. So I did what any decent alcoholic, ex-con, American would do… I went to the fridge and the liquor cabinet, then poured, mixed and measured. Thus Mangria was born.” — Adam Carolla

SuicideGirls Radio / Carolla Drinks Offer

You can purchase all three delicious flavors of SGR’s fave luscious libation, Mangria — and the most excellent Endless Rant IPA — via CarollaDrinks.com. Fans of SG Radio can get $5 off any bottle of Mangria using this special discount coupon code: SG (unlimited use, code is good until December 31, 2017).

For more info visit Carolla Drink’s websiteFacebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Apr 2017 28

by Nicole Powers

Amanda Palmer is in the process of redefining the nature of artistic freedom. Having escaped the gilded shackles of her major record label, she famously made her 2012 album, Theatre Is Evil, with the help of 24,883 fans who crowdfunded the recording via Kickstarter to the tune of $1,192,793.00. However, the hype surrounding the record-breaking fundraiser almost suffocated the album, as the media focused on the money rather than the artistic merits of the music — a huge shame given that it’s undoubtably one of her best.

Seeking a less transient form of funding that would embrace one of Palmer’s greatest assets, her relationship with her fans, in March, 2015 she joined Patreon. The alternative crowdfunding platform helps creators fund their work via a subscriber base of patrons who are either charged monthly or per item created (Palmer chooses to charge per “thing”, since it allows her to take time off guilt-free). In the two years since she joined, Palmer’s incredibly loyal fanbase have helped her become one of the top 3 content creators on Patreon by number of patrons. At the time of writing, Palmer has 9,386 patrons who give her a total of $36,598 per thing.

This has bought Palmer an incredible amount of freedom to create what she wants, when she wants. But with it comes a new set of constraints and responsibilities — many of them self-imposed. Because this form of artistic funding is so new (albeit that it’s based on a concept that’s as old as the ages), Palmer is still in the process of creating her own rules.

On May 5, 2017, her latest Patreon-funded project, I Can Spin A Rainbow, will be released into the ether. The haunting and heartbreakingly beautiful, atmospheric and melancholy album is a collaboration with one of her heroes, Edward Ka-Spel, the co-founder and frontman of The Legendary Pink Dots. The record was recorded in the UK at the Essex home studio of Palmer’s friend Imogen Heap.

I caught up with Palmer by phone to talk about the creative process and the challenges that come with the freedom of patronage.

Nicole Powers: I first saw you on June 30, 2007 at the Greek Theater with the Dresden Dolls on Cindy Lauper’s True Colors tour. It’s a very special year for us. We’re celebrating our ten-year anniversary.

AP: Oh. Awesome… I remember that tour very well. It was a total hodgepodge of amazingness and weirdness.

NP: You’ve had a fascinating journey since then. I was just watching a 2005 documentary on the Cloud Club [a residential artist commune based out of a brownstone in Boston where Palmer lives and where her band The Dresden Dolls was nurtured]. Do you miss those days?

AP: I still have that apartment. It hasn’t changed a bit. Actually, I’m driving there on Sunday… I mean, the days have definitely changed. I have a child and a husband and a house out in the country now, in addition to my bohemian apartment. Philosophically, I think it’s important not to spend a lot of time missing things. There’s too much going on right now for me to think that it’s a good idea to spend energy on those things. I loved my free-wheeling, bohemian existence, but I also wouldn’t want to be stuck in it forever. It would get stale.

NP: When I last spoke to you, in 2009, it was just after “Oasis” had been released. The song was based on very disturbing events in your life that happened when you were 17, and you spoke about how you sought solace in your favorite band, The Pink Dots. It’s wonderful that things have come full circle and you actually get to work with your hero. How did that come about?

AP: Its original seeds were planted ten years ago, probably. I’ve been in touch with the band ever since I was a teenager. When I was 20 I went out on the road and did merch for them in Germany for a couple of days. I knew them and they knew me, as people. They did a tour opening up for the Dresden Dolls in Germany in the mid-2000s — it was probably 2006. During that tour I floated the idea that it was on my fantasy list to someday collaborate on a record with him. He said, absolutely, someday, let’s do it.

In the list of projects that I wanted to do before I died, it was up there towards the top, along with making a record with my dad. I actually knocked off two Bucket List records in one year — I’m really proud of myself. And they couldn’t be more different. I made this super sweet, sincere, fancy guitar and piano record with my dad, and this album with Edward is completely different — a completely different mood, much more electronic. Maybe there’s also something important in my life; having a child and recognizing my various fathers in various incarnations.

NP: I was reading an interview that you did a while back where you spoke about the internal battle that you have between musical inspiration and meditation, and how often very complete ideas came to you when you’re alone during your practice. How does that work when there’s another person in the room? How did the actual creative process work between you and Edward?

AP: It’s a fantastic question, because I didn’t know how it was going to work when I went into making this record with Edward. Because I’m not a co-writer. I’ve always been a real lone wolf as a songwriter, mostly by choice. Because, for me, songwriting is such an incredibly intimate, personal act that the idea of doing it with someone else doesn’t make any sense to me — as much as it would make sense to do anything. So I was nervous because I just didn’t feel like a seasoned co-writer and collaborator, whereas Edward has made records with tons of people.

For that reason, I just showed up completely open-minded and ready to work — ready to write and ready to do anything. I brought old pieces of things, and I brought little bits of text, and I brought voice memos, you know, sung to myself on walks five years ago. I just brought a junk box of interesting bits. Edward had a similar pile of thoughts and fragments and we just played a game of creative ping pong. Sometimes he would start the ball rolling and he would give me a piece of text and I would try to fit it into some kind of arrangement with the piano. Sometimes I would just sit and play something and he would dream up and imagine a story to go on top of it.

As I imagined — as I feared even — it was incredibly intimate, personal co-processing. You have to have an immense amount of trust and respect for someone to sit around and go to your vulnerable, creative place. But Edward and I had such an immense amount of respect for each other that it worked. He really taught me to be a lot braver about doing my process in front of another person. I may be not afraid to walk around naked in public, but I’m actually very afraid to write songs in front of people.

It just feels so incredibly emotionally naked, to sit there writing lyrics, and chucking them out, and futzing with melodies, and playing wrong chords. It’s just something that I’m really only used to doing alone in a room by myself, so to do it in front of someone else felt scary and thrilling — and ultimately really rewarding because what we got out the other side was a record that we’re both so, so proud of.

NP: I imagine too, when you’re working with another person, it’s hard to hide behind abstraction. When you’re working on something that’s difficult for you to deal with in a song, you can be abstract about it — you know what it means, but you leave the world to interpret it. But, when you’re bringing an idea in a room to share with another human being and you’re going to work on it together, I guess you actually have to explain what the abstraction means.

AP: Either that or you have to not question the other’s poetic motives. We didn’t have to discuss and dissect every single lyric and every single adjective. We didn’t always question each other’s dressings, you know? We wrote in a way that made sense, and made sense for that particular song.

One of the things that I loved so much about writing with Edward is he actually rewound me back to a songwriting space that I was in more in my 20s where I had a lot more dressings and opaqueness in my lyrics… The first Dresden Dolls record, there are some songs on that that are just impossible to understand unless you’re me — and even if you are me. Fast-forward 20 years from the writing of some of those songs and the material that I’m writing now, some of it is so incredibly literal and soapy, which is wonderful. It is its own skill to write a good, easily digestible, literal song, but I’ve really strayed away from my more loose, poetic songwriting. It was almost like working with Edward gave me a hall pass to go straight back to 19 and write the way I used to write, especially when I was under a heavier Pink Dots influence. It was always better to say things in a way that could be interpreted six different ways than directly.

NP: How long did it take you to find your groove working together? And what song did you find that groove on?

AP: Funnily enough, it took us five fucking minutes to get comfortable with each other. There was just so much love in the room — especially since our first attempt to make the record, actually our first couple of attempts to get together, were torn apart by acts of god. Our second real legit try to get together involved me showing up at Edward’s place and on day two getting a phone call that I had fly back to the States to be at a friend’s deathbed. It was very ill-starred. By the time we actually were sitting in a room together, having tried for so many years and having such a close call, we were just so excited to finally get to work after so much had already gone down — we were already really emotionally attached. The interesting thing about our first day of work is that the day before that had actually been a year before that and I was eight-months pregnant and sobbing in Edward’s arms at a train station that I had to go watch my friend die. So we had become quite close and we just slipped into a groove very easily. Edward’s really easy to work with.

I’ve luckily never been in a nightmare collaboration. I’ve been blessed with really delightful, easy to work with collaborators, from Jherek Bischoff to Jason Webley and all of the other people that I have arranged with and co-written with in the last ten years or so. But, with Edward, there is an incredible sweetness about him. He is really not self-conscious about his process and he has no ego whatsoever. The two of us just got to amuse, and impress and delight each other. Why else would you create a record together?

The older I get, and the more projects I do, the more concerned I am about the process itself being enjoyable. When you’re a professional musician you realize that that’s actually the content of your life. The desire to work with good, compassionate collaborators starts to take importance over whatever is going to come out the other end of the tube. That starts to matter less and whether or not you want to sit down and have dinner with this person starts to matter more — because this is your life. You’re like, oh right, if I don’t like the people I’m working with, my life is going to be miserable.

NP: You once said, “A perfect song is a captured moment of inspiration barely touched.” On this album, what song would you say most embodies that?

AP: Probably “The Clock At The Back Of The Cage,” which is far and away my favorite track on the record. I had the general idea for it brewing the entire time Edward and I were working on the record. I even mentioned to Edward that I wanted to write a song like it. It was just an unformed, fetal-being just bouncing around in my brain as we worked. Then Imogen had this beautiful glockenspiel in her studio, and it was like the song was just waiting there to come out one night. I grabbed the glockenspiel and wrote the opening part on the glockenspiel thinking that that would just be a cute introduction and it would probably be a piano song, and it would probably have Edward’s looping, and it would probably sound a lot like the rest of the record. But it was such an emotionally painful song that it just wanted to stay sounding small. So we left it that way. But then we put that really foreboding underbelly of sound beneath it. Sometimes you finish a song and you just know that you have a completed, perfect piece of work — and that’s the way I felt after that one.

NP: What was the nugget of inspiration that kept visiting your head and not leaving you?

AP: I’m not sure I can discuss that one… Let’s just say that it is a very, very personal song and leave it at that.

NP: Fair enough. When we last spoke, you were looking ahead to life beyond a major label. Since then, that philosophy has come fruition, first with your blockbuster Kickstarter, and now with Patreon, and your TED Talk, The Art of Asking, which you’ve expanded into a book. How do you think your process has changed from making a record for a label versus making a record for your fans?

AP: It’s actually quite an easy answer, which is, being on a label never changed my process. If anything, getting off the label gave me an immense amount of freedom — maybe too much freedom, because I was just following every last whim for so many years. I was just drunk on my ability to create music and put it out, especially given the digital free-for-all of the internet. Knowing that I could make music and literally put it out that day was so delicious after being in the golden handcuffs of a major label.

Sometimes I look back on my musical track record post-Dresden Dolls and it just looks like an insane patchwork, a random-ass shit show with no forethought. And that’s exactly what it was. But I was so fucking happy. I was just like, I want to make a record of Radiohead covers, I want to make a fucking weird-ass musical concept record about conjoined twins, I want to do this, I want to do that — and then I would just do it.

It was so delicious to be able to do what I wanted that I didn’t care. Then I sort of set all of my serious songwriting in one box and I collected it all together for Theater Is Evil, which is the Kickstarter record, which I still think is far and away one of the best records that I’ve ever made. I am just so, so proud of it. Then, you get this interesting twist in the story; I was convinced that because I captured everybody’s attention because of the Kickstarter that everyone would also pay attention to the record. But, mostly, all the media discussed when they discussed me was money. That was really disheartening. That was a shitty year.

NP: I can see that that must have been incredibly frustrating.

AP: Well, amen. So, yeah, that’s one of the things that I feel is a really hard won lesson. My dialogue with my hardcore listeners, and my dialogue with the mass media and the mass internet, they are parallel conversations but they’re different conversations. And you wait six months and the landscape changes right before you, especially in terms of how things are coming out.

It’s why I am so grateful to have this group of 10,000 people who just trust me. They trust me not to screw them. They trust the fact that I’m an authentic artist and that my heart is in the right place and I just want to make work that I believe in. And that relationship is a hard won relationship. Just like the Kickstarter. It’s not something that just happens overnight because you have a hit single. It’s something that happens because you toured for years and years, and you hang out with everybody, and you prove that you’re a lifer.

I’m really proud of this space that I built where all of those people want to support me. Sometimes I can’t even really believe that it’s real — and it’s been going on for two years. In a sense, nothing has freed me up artistically as that security — of knowing that I don’t have to, all of a sudden, hop on a tour bus and tour in order to pay for a project. I will never need corporate sponsorship. I will never need to compromise because I have enough. I have enough support. It’s such a wonderful feeling as an artist to know that there are enough people there to easily float your ability to create. It’s awesome.

NP: It has also broken the mold that you have to have an album, with three singles for the label to market, to have a “thing” that someone will buy. One of the lovely examples of that is your “Angel Gabriel” recording and video that you released over Christmas. I could imagine that if that had been in the context of a major label, they would have wanted you to do a whole album of schmaltzy Christmas songs and you would have lost the entire point of it. That song and video is so much more of a statement on its own than it would be if it was buried amidst ten other songs that you were forced to throw together to make a thing that a major label would accept.

AP: Yeah. Exactly. It’s really wonderful deciding what to do with everybody’s money as well, and just challenging myself to be as ethical as possible. Because on the one hand I have this wonderful freedom to know that I can sit down at the piano at any time, make arrangements anytime, write music anytime, and know that I have a guaranteed audience, not only to listen to it, but to pay for it. But on the other hand, I feel this mighty responsibility that I don’t want to let people down and I want to spend their money ethically, you know? Because there I am, basically doing a bunch of artistic curating. I’m deciding who to hire, and who to engineer, and who is going to photograph, and who is going to video, who is going to design the sets. There is something really nice knowing that that’s not the label’s money, but it’s the people’s money. As I’m hiring a whole bunch of artists in Cuba, who are really grateful for the work, I love that that money is coming from my fans and not from some corporate boss in the sky. It just feels really good.

NP: You spoke earlier about the parallel conversations you have between your fans and the mass media. Obviously you have a very special relationship with your fans, and sometimes a comment that you make, that is completely understandable within the context of your fanbase, will get completely taken out of context by the mainstream media. For example, the whole “Trump will make punk rock great again” thing. I absolutely know what you’re trying to say, but seeing it taken out of context for clickbait was kind of offensive. I imagine you don’t want to self-censor, so how do you deal with that?

AP: I just work on the running assumption that people are going to misunderstand me and I try not to give a shit, honestly. And as far as Donald Trump making punk rock great again — we should be so lucky. That was more of a call to my fellow artists that we need to up our game in the face of this insanity. I hope we all do.

NP: It’s so hard to live in a world where we’re seeing hard won rights being taken away from us and society regressing rather than progressing. Do you feel more of a sense of urgency now that you’re a mother to try to shift things in the right direction?

AP: No. I have always felt a sense of urgency for change. In fact, if anything, having a child has forced me to slow down and be more mindful and smell more flowers with my baby. Because his childhood feels incredibly precious to me. He’s not going to appreciate a mother who is spending too much time trying to be a warrior hero. I mean, I will do what I can do, but I also sometimes feel like the biggest gift I can give to the world right now is being a good mother to my child. As hokey as that may sound, it’s how I feel.

Amada Palmer — Theater Is Evil Tour, New York (Photo: Nicole Powers)

Catch Palmer and Ka-Spel on tour in the United States and Europe from May 17 thru June 18, 2017.

Photos taken by Nicole Powers at Webster Hall in NYC on September 11, 2012.

Related Posts

Amanda Palmer — Theatre Is Evil
Amanda Palmer — Evelyn Evelyn
Amana Palmer and Neil Gaiman Live
Amanda Palmer — Rebel With A Cause

This interview has been edited for length and clarity, and is published here under Creative Commons License 4.0. It may be reposted freely with attribution to the author, Nicole Powers, and this notice.

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Apr 2017 26

By Blogbot

This Wednesday, April 26 on SuicideGirls Radio, hosts Nicole Powers and Bradley Suicide will be joined by Glam Skanks, who’ll be talking about their new album, Glitter City, their new single, “Bad Bitch”, and their recent US tour and upcoming UK tour supporting The King of the Wild Frontier, Adam Ant.

**UPDATE**

ICYMI: Watch last night’s show feat. the more glam than skanky Glam Skanks here or via the player below — and if you love it, please share it! Xox

You can listen – and watch – SuicideGirls Radio live on Wednesday nights from 8 til 9 PM at our state-of-the-art, all digital home on zinna.tv or on our Facebook page via Facebook LIVE!

For updates on all things SG Radio-related, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

About Glam Skanks

Glam Skanks are Veronica Volume (guitar), Ali Cat (lead vocals), Millie (bass), and Cassie (rrums). Together the quartet create a colorful audiovisual extravaganza using familiar tints inspired by T Rex, The Runaways, David Bowie, and The Sweet, with the drama of Alice Cooper and the genuine rock sensibility of Aerosmith, all wrapped up in a full-blown cosmetic Rocky Horror Show meets Hedwig androgyny.

Pure entertainment and bigger than life, Glam Skanks are here to light up the world with their new release, Glitter City. A rock & roll rollercoaster ride in a blazing cloud of glitter and raining feather boas, Glam Skanks are high-energy, free-spirited and lusty, with a bravado that screams Sunset Strip dreams and Hollywood nights that never end. They will wake you up, smack you down, get your heart beating, and your mascara running. Their music is drag Rock for the masses.

Following a show opening for Alice Cooper and sold-out shows on their North American tour opening as direct support for pop icon Adam Ant, Glam Skanks have been hand-picked a second time to open for Adam as part of his Anthems — The Singles tour in the UK kicking off on May 5, 2017.  

For more on Glam Skanks visit:

GlamSkanks.com
facebook.com/Glamskanx/
instagram.com/glamskanks/
twitter.com/glamskanks
youtube.com/user/glamskanks

550_Mangria

The World’s Leading BYOB Radio Show Is Sponsored By Mangria

“As a nightly consumer of red wine, I was shocked one evening to find I had just half a glass left in the bottle. So I did what any decent alcoholic, ex-con, American would do… I went to the fridge and the liquor cabinet, then poured, mixed and measured. Thus Mangria was born.” — Adam Carolla

SuicideGirls Radio / Carolla Drinks Offer

You can purchase all three delicious flavors of SGR’s fave luscious libation, Mangria — and the most excellent Endless Rant IPA — via CarollaDrinks.com. Fans of SG Radio can get $5 off any bottle of Mangria using this special discount coupon code: SG (unlimited use, code is good until December 31, 2017).

For more info visit Carolla Drink’s websiteFacebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Apr 2017 18

By Blogbot

This Wednesday, April 19 on SuicideGirls Radio, hosts Nicole Powers and Bradley Suicide will be joined by disco cowboy Kennedy, who’ll be talking about his brand new video single “Bareback” — an ode to his favorite concealed weapon!

You can listen – and watch – SuicideGirls Radio live on Wednesday nights from 8 til 9 PM at our state-of-the-art, all digital home on zinna.tv or on our Facebook page via Facebook LIVE!

For updates on all things SG Radio-related, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

About Kennedy

Kennedy is equal parts Dr. Dre, Klaus Nomi, and Robert Evans. He developed, produced and co-wrote “10,000 Emerald Pools” on BØRNS’s debut album Dopamine (Interscope). The song was produced in a squat with no utilities in Eagle Rock, CA and was named after Kennedy’s mother’s street address in Las Vegas. Kennedy also co-wrote and produced the single “Bob Marley” for Grizfolk (Virgin Records).

As a recording artist, Kennedy’s underground club anthem Karate was featured in the viral phenomenon “Dollar Shave Club”, The Namesake, and independently sold over 45,000 copies. His viral smash video “Your Mama” had over 1 million YouTube views in a week. His songs are featured in Napoleon Dynamite, Get Him To The Greek, Nick and Nora’s Infinite Playlist90210, and Shameless.

His British band Nightbus (Island Records UK) have been feature on BBC Radio 1, The New York Times, NPR, and The Drudge Report. Kennedy’s variety show, “The Kennedy Administration” has featured guest appearances from Thomas Middleditch (Silicon Valley), Rich Sommer (Madmen), BØRNS’, and many of today’s most relevant comedians.

He led the house band at the original Largo comedy night sharing the stage with Louie C.K., Sarah Silverman, Zack Galafianakis, and many more. Kennedy formed the Silversun Pickups and traversed the globe as a Soundcloud fellowship grant recipient.

Kennedy currently lives in a tree house in Mt. Washington, CA. He drives a 1974 Dodge Dart, eats macrobiotic, and has a license to carry a concealed automatic weapon — “Bareback” of course.

For more on Kennedy visit:

facebook.com/KennedyKarate/
instagram.com/kennedykarate/
twitter.com/kennedy_karate

550_Mangria

The World’s Leading BYOB Radio Show Is Sponsored By Mangria

“As a nightly consumer of red wine, I was shocked one evening to find I had just half a glass left in the bottle. So I did what any decent alcoholic, ex-con, American would do… I went to the fridge and the liquor cabinet, then poured, mixed and measured. Thus Mangria was born.” — Adam Carolla

SuicideGirls Radio / Carolla Drinks Offer

You can purchase all three delicious flavors of SGR’s fave luscious libation, Mangria — and the most excellent Endless Rant IPA — via CarollaDrinks.com. Fans of SG Radio can get $5 off any bottle of Mangria using this special discount coupon code: SG (unlimited use, code is good until December 31, 2017).

For more info visit Carolla Drink’s websiteFacebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Apr 2017 11

By Blogbot

This Wednesday, April 12 on SuicideGirls Radio, hosts Nicole Powers and Bradley Suicide will be joined by Jade Howard and Dennis Hamlin of the LA-based band 222, who’ll be returning to our studio to talk about their new album and upcoming tour.

**UPDATE**
Watch last night’s show feat. the triumphant return of Jade Howard and Dennis Hamlin of 222 here or via the player below. The duo last visited our studio in June 2016 — yes, SuicideGirls Radio had them on BEFORE they were KROQ famous!!!

You can listen – and watch – SuicideGirls Radio live on Wednesday nights from 8 til 9 PM at our state-of-the-art, all digital home on zinna.tv or on our Facebook page via Facebook LIVE!

For updates on all things SG Radio-related, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

222

About 222

The hooks keep coming—and so do the left turns—on the new and second album, I’m Not Trying To Be You…Just Kidding I’m Trying To Be You, by the Los Angeles-based 222. Creatively blending alternative rock, rooted in the ‘80s and ‘90s, with modern dance flares throughout the eleven tracks, the co-ed duo of vocalist Jade Howard and vocalist/guitarist Dennis Hamlin create a sound that’s both irresistible and mysterious.

I’m Not Trying To Be You… is the follow-up to 222’s debut album 2015’s Libretto. That album’s first single “One Night Stand” earned them airplay on Los Angeles tastemaker radio station KROQ, among other radio outlets. Their provocative self-produced videos for “One Night Stand” and “Headcake” are vivid mini movies; they can be seen—along with the “Fair Weather Send Off” lyric video—on 222, their YouTube channel. 222 recorded, and arranged all songs on I’m Not Trying To Be You… — as they did on their debut Libretto — and recorded in their home studio.

“Jade and I have extremely similar taste which makes it a very simple, easy process,” says Dennis. “I write, arrange, and play all the instruments on the album and run it through Jade’s filter. She gives me her opinions/ideas and we change whatever needed resulting in 222. Jade and I have been friends for a long time; we know each other very well and almost always agree on what the music should be. Live, the ferocious Tosha Jones plays the drum parts and came into the band a fan so she too has very similar taste so it just works. Because of that when we all add our own personalities into the live aspect it only gets better.”

The prolific songwriting team of Jade and Dennis draw their musical inspiration from books, movies and life experiences. On the new album, they dive deeper into song concepts while keeping the emotional element sourced from personal places. “Our life experiences definitely play a big part in our songs,” says Dennis, who also produced the album. “Even on the more extreme ideas, there is usually some sort of home ground from which they came.”

“The title track ‘I’m Not Trying To Be You…’ is about Jade and I moving out to LA from our small towns and being around each other so much that we actually start becoming each other, says Dennis. “I feel that describes how this album differs from the first in the way that the writing is sort of a sequel to Libretto; it just flowed naturally from the last one but there is definitely evolution happening.” Jade adds, “We have gotten to the point where we don’t have to talk. We just start doing the same thing or get ready to go somewhere together.”

222 are psyched to bring the new songs on the road and kick them into an even higher gear. The band is committed to deepening their bond with fans and garnering new ones. Asked what they’d like to overhear one fan talking to another right after a 222 show, Dennis says, “Refreshing to see someone doing their own art and not following a trend. And they’re fucking amazing!!”

For more on 222 visit:

222band.com
facebook.com/222jdband
instagram.com/222jdband/
twitter.com/222jdband

Related Posts

SG Radio feat. 222 — June 6, 2016

550_Mangria

The World’s Leading BYOB Radio Show Is Sponsored By Mangria

“As a nightly consumer of red wine, I was shocked one evening to find I had just half a glass left in the bottle. So I did what any decent alcoholic, ex-con, American would do… I went to the fridge and the liquor cabinet, then poured, mixed and measured. Thus Mangria was born.” — Adam Carolla

SuicideGirls Radio / Carolla Drinks Offer

You can purchase all three delicious flavors of SGR’s fave luscious libation, Mangria — and the most excellent Endless Rant IPA — via CarollaDrinks.com. Fans of SG Radio can get $5 off any bottle of Mangria using this special discount coupon code: SG (unlimited use, code is good until December 31, 2017).

For more info visit Carolla Drink’s websiteFacebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

postimg
Apr 2017 04

By Blogbot

This Wednesday, April 5 on SuicideGirls Radio, hosts Nicole Powers and Bradley Suicide will be joined by Lynette Carolla and Jay Miller of Carolla Drinks, who make our fave luscious libation, Mangria.

**UPDATE**
ICYMI: Watch last night’s show feat. Lynette Carolla and Jay Miller of Carolla Drinks here or via the player below.

You can listen – and watch – SuicideGirls Radio live on Wednesday nights from 8 til 9 PM at our state-of-the-art, all digital home on zinna.tv or on our Facebook page via Facebook LIVE!

For updates on all things SG Radio-related, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

About Lynette Carolla, Jay Miller, and Carolla Drinks

Lynette Carolla grew up in Souther California with her Italian parents and brothers. At age 7, Lynette’s parents enrolled her in SAG/AFTRA and got her an agent. During her youth she’s booked several acting jobs including a commercial for Cadillac, an ABC TV movie of the week, and a Mighty Carson Art Player on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.

Growing up in the industry, her father Richard was an advertising director at a local television station, Lynette knew she didn’t want to be an actress. She was interested in the business side of television. Starting her career working in syndication sales for companies for the big four networks, she quickly learned the process of developing, producing and syndicating for TV with many shows such as Roseanne, Third Rock From The Sun, and That 70’s Show.

At the age of 25, Lynette was working for Brandon Tartikoff’s New World Entertainment when she met a young, struggling comedian at the beginning of his career, Adam Carolla. Adam had just finished shooting a pilot for FOX affiliates called Loveline based on his radio show with Dr. Drew. In 1997, Lynette moved over to ABC Television as manager of Programming and Scheduling for Primetime. In 2002, Adam and Lynette were married, and in ’06 their twins Santino and Natalia were born.

In 2009, Adam started his own podcasting network and Lynette started a podcast which she still hosts twice a week titled For Crying Out Loud with her co-host and bestselling author/comedian, Stefanie Wilder-Taylor, where they discuss everything from raising twins to relationship woes of being in a longterm marriages, to Netflix series and books they’re obsessed with. Nothing is off limits, which unfortunately leads to uncomfortable situations such as Parent Nights at the kids schools.

***

When Lynette was 4 months pregnant, Adam’s pal Jimmy Kimmel saw Lynette struggling with groceries up the stairs. He suggested they hire a friend of his family who was moving out from Chicago, Jay Miller. He started as Lynette’s assistant, carrying groceries, housework and buying baby formula. After the twins were born in 2006 Jay went on to be Adam’s personal assistant working out of their home in Hollywood, CA. Jay did everything from coordinating travel, setting meetings to ordering car parts, organizing Adam’s home garage and refurbishing Adam’s growing car collection. Because of Adam’s busy schedule Jay was often left in charge of major projects involving construction at Adam’s home. Jay oversaw the demolishment to the building of Adam’s super garage which was featured on the cover of Fast Company magazine in 2009.

***

Adam often talked about making himself a high octane, wine cocktail at home called Mangria on his popular podcast, The Adam Carolla Show, which resulted in calls from Napa. The winery asked if he was interested in actually bottling the cocktail, they would be happy to send over a few samples to try and narrow down the perfect formula. Once the signature Red Mangria gained popularity, they developed a new white flavor, followed by the Brose.

Adam being as busy as Adam always is, he handed the alcohol brand over to Lynette to run as she was adiment that females would love the product as well — even though ‘Man’ was in the title. Having no experience in the alcohol industry, no seed money other than what was being provided by the Carollas, Lynette recruited their adoptive son, Jay Miller. It made perfect sense to have Jay partner up with Lynette to launch Mangria and take it to the next level. With Jay’s law degree, his connections and knowledge of the alcohol industry, plus being a member of the Carolla family, Jay decided to go full time building the Carolla Drinks brand.

In Jan of 2016, a brewery out of Redondo Beach showed up at one of Adam’s live shows and offered him a few samples to take home of their IPA beer. Jay knew the guys from King Harbor and helped them facilitate a deal with Carolla Drinks. Within 4 months the launch of King Harbor’s Adam Carolla’s Endless Rant IPA was born and launched at Adam’s Toyota Grand Prix race last year.

Carolla Drinks is powered by Lynette Carolla as CEO and Brand Ambassador, with Jay Miller who is the COO, CTO as well as head of Marketing and Distribution. Carolla Drinks is unique, and unlike the majority of celebrity endorsed alcohol beverage companies on the market, as it is solely funded and ran by the Carolla’s personally. Carolla Drinks is a grassroots, boots on the ground, family owned and operated company. Relying on the loyal Adam Carolla fanbase to spread the word and having a solid, good tasting product that puts the brand above all others. The Carolla Digital employees who work for Adam at the podcast studio daily, have been embraced by his audience and have grown to be known as The Lackeys. Today The Lackeys travel with Lynette and Jay around the country nationally hosting their infamous Carolla Drinks Bar Crawls.

SuicideGirls Radio / Carolla Drinks Offer

You can purchase all three delicious flavors of Mangria — and the most excellent Endless Rant IPA — via CarollaDrinks.com. We’re excited to announce that fans of SG Radio can get $5 off any bottle of Mangria using this special discount coupon code: SG (unlimited use, code is good until December 31, 2017).

Related Posts
SG Radio feat. Lynette Carolla
SG Radio feat. Beer… And The Carolla Drinks Boys!

550_Mangria

The World’s Leading BYOB Radio Show Is Sponsored By Mangria

“As a nightly consumer of red wine, I was shocked one evening to find I had just half a glass left in the bottle. So I did what any decent alcoholic, ex-con, American would do… I went to the fridge and the liquor cabinet, then poured, mixed and measured. Thus Mangria was born.” — Adam Carolla

For more info visit Carolla Drink’s websiteFacebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Mar 2017 27

By Blogbot

This Wednesday, March 29 on SuicideGirls Radio, hosts Nicole Powers and Bradley Suicide will be joined by Minnesota hip-hop artist Mod Sun, who’ll be giving us the behind-the-scenes gossip on his new album, Movie.

You can listen – and watch – SuicideGirls Radio live on Wednesday nights from 8 til 9 PM at our state-of-the-art, all digital home on zinna.tv or on our Facebook page via Facebook LIVE!

For updates on all things SG Radio-related, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

About Mod Sun

29-year-old Mod Sun is emerging as a pillar in the hip hop scene of Minnesota. With an uncanny ability to tinker with the boundaries of creativity, Sun has emerged as a rising star in the congested world of rap.

Born in Bloomington, Mod Sun developed a strong adoration for everything music related. At a young age, he clung to The Allman Brothers, Bob Dylan, Blink 182, and Charles Hamilton as his sources of inspiration. With two supportive parents sprinkling huge doses of hope and love, Mod grew increasingly obsessed with the idea of one day chasing his dreams.

With an expansive musical palette that consisted of rock and hip hop, Mod Sun became a multi-faceted star in both arenas. At 17, he dipped his hands in the rock world when he joined the local band Four Letter Lie. His journey with the group allowed him to experience tour life for the very first time. Then, at 20, the precocious musician flexed his talent on the drums when he joined his next band Scary Kids Scaring Kids.

Due to his ability to wow the crowd as a drummer, the group allowed him to serve as an opener for their tour. Despite a few rough performances, Sun realized his potential to shine as a solo act. The high of performing in places like Australia and New Zealand was too much for him to overlook. Because of that, he drifted away from the rock world and pursued rap full-time. With no help on the production front, he released his first mixtape, I’ll Buy Myself in 2009.

“The reason I didn’t start putting out Mod Sun music earlier is because I always wanted to step away from the drums. The only reason I didn’t earlier is because I knew no one in Minnesota that made beats. I knew nothing about making beats. So, I had to figure out the program and learn how to make my own beats. The first song I ever recorded rapping is on that album.”

With a voracious appetite for success, Mod churned out five more mixtapes and three EPs before releasing his first album Look Up in 2015 with Rostrum Records. Laced with refreshing, mood quenching songs like “Free Love”, “Goddess”, and “My Hippy”, it was easy to see why Mod won over Benjy Grinberg – the President of Rostrum Records.

The day I signed to Rostrum, I threw a pool party at my house in North Hollywood – the original Hippy Hideout. That’s where we were at when I signed my contract. I had the whole team over. It all started a month prior to that day when I signed the contract at my house, as well. Benjy – the owner of Rostrum – came over to my house in North Hollywood. We sat down and listened to Look Up . Out of all of the songs I played, Benjy stopped me at ‘My Favorite Shirt Is My Skin’ and he made run it back. That’s what did it for me.”

After showcasing his artistry with some of Billboard’s biggest darlings in G. Eazy and Machine Gun Kelly on his debut album, Mod realized for his second go-around that evolution would be essential. With the world becoming a drearier place, his sophomore album Movie will be the project to not only re-instill that much needed happiness to smile again, but to illustrate his growth as an artist.

With Bobby Johnson, Arthur McArthur, and Don Cannon playing instrumental roles in crafting Mod’s new sound for Movie , the Minnesota star will be swimming in new waters creatively for his second album.

“The shit we did together is something totally brand new for me. That’s kind of the basis of the new album. It’s kind of in a way a reinvention of what I’ve been doing with a concept I’ve been working with this whole time,” says Sun.

He adds, “I have a new song on this album called “Beautiful Problems” with Maty Noyes and Gnash. We have a song together that’s seriously going to be on every radio station. It is really going to be. The reason all of that is possible is because I’ve stepped out and took a risk on trying new things.”

Mod Sun will be heading out on a national tour on April 4 to support the album. Dates can be found here: bandsintown.com/modsun

For more on Mod Sun visit:
modsunmusic.com
facebook.com/modsun/
twitter.com/MODSUN
instagram.com/modsun/
soundcloud.com/modsun

550_Mangria

The World’s Leading BYOB Radio Show Is Sponsored By Mangria

“As a nightly consumer of red wine, I was shocked one evening to find I had just half a glass left in the bottle. So I did what any decent alcoholic, ex-con, American would do… I went to the fridge and the liquor cabinet, then poured, mixed and measured. Thus Mangria was born.” — Adam Carolla

For more info visit Carolla Drink’s websiteFacebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Mar 2017 21

It’s hard enough when a beloved book is made into a film for a director to overcome people’s preconceived notions of the characters. But when you’re working on the visual elements of a project that’s based on a cult-turned-contemporary classic book that’s been made into an acclaimed and highly stylized film, it’s exponentially harder to compete with the cherished visions people hold in their head. And when you factor in that the protagonist in the movie was played by Brad Pitt at peak cool, improving on veritable perfection is nigh on impossible.

That’s the challenge comic artist Cameron Stewart faced when he got the gig to turn Fight Club, which was first a book written by Chuck Palahniuk and then a film directed by David Fincher, into a comic series — a concept in and of itself that many deemed to be inconceivable when Palahniuk first announced it. Such an endeavor could only be accomplished by a true comic book superhero, and Stewart certainly qualifies as one. The multi-award winning artist has a résumé that includes Batgirl, Catwoman, Scooby Doo, Seaguy, Batman & Robin, Assassin’s Creed, Amazing X-Men, and Guardians of the Galaxy, to name but a few. He also just happens to be the man responsible for transforming SuicideGirls into comic form!

We caught up with Stewart to talk about Fight Club 2 just after its release as a hardcover graphic novel. Stewart, who was busy packing for a transatlantic move from Glasgow back to his hometown of Toronto, was kind enough to take our call.

Read the full interview on SuicideGirls.com/.

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