postimg
Apr 2012 11

by Nahp Suicide


[Above: Talamia]

Talamia describes herself as a “photographer, illustrative designer, and thinker.” She lives is South Africa. She has been shooting for SuicideGilrs since 2008, and has more than 30 sets in the site.

How did you first get involved with SuicideGirls?

I had always loved the concept and internet stalked the models of SG ever since I could remember but was always under the misconception that it was a US only thing. The day I came to realize this was not so was when I randomly stumbled upon a local girl’s FB profile page whose profile picture had the SG logo on it. It was Lynx, and she introduced me to Diaz, and from there I threw myself at SG with a fervor.



What’s your background photography-wise?

I have a four year degree in BA: Information Design (aka Information Architecture), which covered some photography here and there, but mostly I am self taught.

 



[Orijin in Art of War]

What was the first photo you had published?

If we’re talking print media then It was probably a campaign series of portraitures of VJs and musicians for MTVbase that ran in a variety of music and youth related magazines.

How would you describe your style?

Having trained as a creative director-designer I find it very difficult to adhere to having one particular style. Or rather, I cannot see it in my work, even though others have said they can. All I can say about my work at this time is that I strive to makes images that are striking with the right amount of contrast to make the image pop.



What gear do you use?

I currently use the Canon range of equipment including a variety of L lenses.




[Lumo in Afterglow]

How important is Photoshop in your final images?

One always continually strives to achieve the desired end result out-of-camera so as to minimize reliance on post-editing, but Photoshop will always be vital for the odd blemish or bruise or stubborn stray hair.



What gives you ideas and inspires you to create such amazing sets?

The question is more like what doesn’t give me ideas for sets. Everything from dreams; the products of popular culture; the things people say; even patterns that emerge in tiles! Everything, no matter how trivial, can make splendid set ideas, and the more idiosyncratic the better. But what helps most directly is getting to know the amazing women I have gotten to work with and allowing them to inspire me.



[Hadess in A Beautiful Mind]

What is your favorite image?

There are so many favorites it’s really hard to choose. From the way the light sculpted Lumo’s beautiful form (in Afterglow – see NSFW image) to the stunning water-like reflection in the image of Hadess (in A Beautiful Mind – see NSFW image).

Tell us why it’s your fave and how you achieved it?

I like using light sources that wrap around the body’s contours to illuminate the fine details of shape and form. Reflective surfaces also provide gorgeous points of visual interest.

Is there anybody or anything you would love to photograph that you haven’t?

I love working with strong creative women. Some that come to mind are (I’ve probably left out three dozen others!) Bexi, Serial, Radeo, Bully, Jamity, Rashel, Prussia, Liu, Clio, AnnaLee, Nena, Waikiki, Manko, GoGo, Rigel, Vice, Annika, Bee, Flux, Lumi. Apart from being tremendously gorgeous, they are all so provocatively intelligent which is the biggest kind of turn on.


[Tarion in Kiss The Machine]

[..]

postimg
Apr 2012 03

by Nahp Suicide


[Above: Waikiki in Walk On The Wild Side – Photographed by Alissa]

Waikiki is from Italy and spends her time shooting between Italy, Holland, London, and Berlin. She has been a SuicideGirl since 2006 and a photographer since 2009.

How did you first get involved with SuicideGirls?

A close gay friend of mine introduced me to SG for the first time. It was the summer of 2005.
 A month later I shot my first set as a model with Albertine. Three years later I did my first one as a photographer.



What’s your background photography-wise?

I have a BA in Fine Arts. I did photography, video, and sculpture. Back then I mainly shot in analog. The dark room was my favorite place in the whole University. 



[Gogo in Mononoke]

What was the first photo you had published?

A self shot photograph which was part of my last year examination project.
It got published on a Dutch catalogue.



How would you describe your style?

My style is continuously mutating. It’s in motion. My photography is pretty varied as is my style. Shooting for the site has definitely changed it. I used to be always an art photographer. I worked with models but on a different level. My photographs were mainly black & white images.
 SG gave me the possibility to embrace a new layer. Capture models’ sexyness, beauty and creativity through their body, moves, peculiarities.

What gear do you use?

I currently use a canon 5D Mark II. I have a few lenses, which I like to switch depending on what the subject is and where I’m shooting. I also have an old Nikon F2 which I’ve started to use again lately, and a fewmore, but due to work and media I mostly use my Canon.




[Fifi in Oui C’est Moi]

How important is Photoshop in your final images?

Since I work on digital images Photoshop has become essential for color correction and to adjust lighting. Needless to say, Photoshop and Lightroom have both become the digital dark room of our future, although, for the most part, good results should always be done ideally with the settings on the camera itself, before you pull the trigger.




What gives you ideas and inspires you to create such amazing sets?

Certainly the model, she is my very first inspiration. I do travel quite often and I am a big observer of spaces, landscape and whatever my eyes capture. Music videos, literature, magazines are a big inspirations as well.




[Cherish in Night Clubbin’]

What is your favorite image?

I couldn’t pick just one.

Tell us why it’s your fave and how you achieved it?

I love working with Janette and everything we did together. She is one of my favorite models I’ve been collaborating with. She is an artist, a performer, and a friend.




Is there anybody or anything you would love to photograph that you haven’t?

I want to photograph a lot more girls, people, anyone who communicates a feeling, a sensation, weather positive or not. People that can tell a storywith their facial and body expressions.
 Among the SG models, probably the first one who comes to my mind would now be Vice. I have adored her since I joined the site. Manko is another artist I would love to collaborate with.
 I fell in love with her mind, her thoughts, her creativity. She is so inspirational in so many ways. Chunny has intrigued me since always. Or Amina, just to mention another one.


[Lass in English Sunset]

Related Posts:
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Zoetica
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Anemona
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. P_Mod
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Talena
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Lavonne
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. DarrylDarko
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Albertine
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Holley
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Dwam
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Writeboy
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. IvyLlamas
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Lavezzarro

postimg
Mar 2012 29

by Blogbot

Artist / SG Member Name: My real name is Gary Mike, and my SG member name is Guss1470. Guss is just a name I like and used while online but I am starting to use my real name more often.

Mission Statement: For my art I really don’t have one. I just like to draw and find out what I can do. The first and main purpose for my art is my own enjoyment, challenge, and to see people enjoy my work. I want to see if I can do it. I like to try different styles just to see if I can.

Medium: Well anything I can get my hands on. I think anything can be a medium but the main one I use is pencil and pen. With my computer it’s a Bamboo and Photoshop. I draw my art on paper first then scan, touch up or trace in Photoshop then color. In the past I have worked with watercolor, color pencil, acrylic, chalk, and clay. I even thought of buying a load of makeup from Mary Kay just to play with skin tones in my art.

Aesthetic: I really don’t know. I like sketchy style, clean style. It’s like the question “who is your favorite band” – it just depends on your mood, what your doing, and how your feeling.

Notable Achievements: I think just making people smile with my art. I really am not aiming for anything when I do my art except to challenge myself and make you smile.

Why We Should Care: Not to sound mean, but you don’t have to. If no one cared about my art I still would be doing the same thing. I have been doing this since I was 3 or 4 and this is what I do for fun. I don’t know any other way. I don’t consider my work special. I draw all the time and throw away my sketches and finished work cause I can do it again. I have given away sketch books to friends, my ex, and to random people because I’m done with them and have no reason to keep them. I think it’s the people that see my art that consider it special so the question goes to you: Why do you like my art???

I Want Me Some: I don’t do contests, I don’t sell my art, I have no political agenda. If you want me to draw something I’ll do it for free. If I have time, all you have to do is ask. You can also check out my work on DeviantArt.

[..]

postimg
Mar 2012 27

by Nahp Suicide


[Above: Zoetica]

Zoetica is a photographer, painter, the proprietress of the popular art and style blog Biorequiem, a co-founder of Coilhouse Magazine, and an occasional cosmonomad. She hails from Moscow, but resides in Los Angeles, California. She has been a photographer for SuicideGirls since 2006, and has shot more than 100 sets for the site.

How did you first get involved with SuicideGirls?

Fractal (a friend of a friend at the time, now a good friend of mine), had scouted me to model. I explained that I was actually in search of a steady job at the time, and she suggested I come in to interview for an intern position. I quickly became a design assistant and, eventually, Sean suggested I try my hand at shooting sets. For a time I also worked as the SG photography coordinator, style technician and in-house photo-editor.



What’s your background photography-wise?

I’m self-taught, having taken photos obsessively my entire life. Before digital, I took cheap little film cameras everywhere – and have seven scrapbooky photo albums to prove it! 




[Georgia in Pirates Cove]

What was the first photo you had published?

I honestly don’t remember. Probably something in one of my schools’ yearbooks or something in a zine.



How would you describe your style?

Obsessive. When I work with SGs, I often ask them to hold a pose for several minutes at a time, while I capture every nuance.
 In my other work, this is true as well. I look at every detail, search for secret spaces and details, whether I’m shooting a portrait, an editorial, a forest, or a steaming breakfast plate (I love food photography – I even break out a macro lens for that sometimes!). My goal is to capture the feeling of the moment, the texture, the energy. The smell, too, if possible. 



What gear do you use?

Generally, I keep it simple: Canon 5D and a 35 1:4 lens, available light only.





[Adria in Soft As Snow]

How important is Photoshop in your final images?

It depends entirely on the image and the mood I’m after that day. For SG, I tend to stick with minimal retouching and color correction for the most part, but some sets call for a more stylized approach. 



What gives you ideas and inspires you to create such amazing sets?

I feed my brain as much as time allows – good input yields good output.





[Radeo in Prisoner]

What is your favorite image?

It has to be this one (see above) of Radeo, from our set called, Prisoner.

Tell us why it’s your fave and how you achieved it?

I think it still might be my favorite set of mine. There was almost no light aside from a far-away overhead fixture, and it worked out perfectly in helping us create the foreboding atmosphere we had in mind.



Is there anybody or anything you would love to photograph that you haven’t?

No – I want to shoot everything, all the time. Like I said – I’m obsessive!


[Doctor in Blazing Streams]


[Opaque in Impish]


[Annika in Classica]


[Amina in Memento]


[Fractal in Heaven In Black]

Related Posts:
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Anemona
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. P_Mod
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Talena
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Lavonne
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. DarrylDarko
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Albertine
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Holley
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Dwam
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Writeboy
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. IvyLlamas
In Focus: The Photographers of SuicideGirls feat. Lavezzarro

postimg
Mar 2012 22

by Blogbot

Artist / SG Member Name: Inks.

Mission Statement: I have always wanted to mix the classic pinup with propaganda art. I always wanted to make art that people can afford.

Medium: Ink, graphite, digital, spray paint.

Aesthetic: Beauty in simplicity, line that shows natural curves not idealized and unrealistic ones.

Notable Achievements: I have been part of over 30 shows in the last 8 years. I have had the honor of showing with artists like Erik Jones, Shepard Fairey, Dennis Brown, Hydro74, and so many other artists. I am also honored to have designed posters for the Hot Toddies, Sharkteeth, and a few other bands.

Why We Should Care: I always wanted to make art that people can afford. I don’t make art to make it rich, but to add richness to peoples lives.

I Want Me Some: You can find me at:
boardinker.tumblr.com
gorillasdontpaint.tumblr.com/
boardinker.com

[..]

postimg
Mar 2012 22

by Andrew Shaffer

On February 18, PayPal contacted ebook distributor Smashwords with an ultimatum: Remove certain types of erotic ebooks (featuring underage characters, incest, bestiality, and rape), or face deactivation of their PayPal account. Since PayPal is integrated into the Smashwords website, they had no choice but to remove the “edgy” erotica identified by PayPal as “unlawful.” No U.S. court had ever found any of the ebooks in question illegal, but that was rather beside the point for PayPal, who seemed to be confusing illegal sexual activities with legal depictions of those activities.

What started as a dispute between a payment processor (PayPal) and a handful of ebook stores (including Smashwords) snowballed into a widely circulated petition from the Electronic Freedom Foundation (signed by the Authors Guild, the CBLDF, and the ACLU, among others) asking PayPal to reverse their policy.

“What I find chilling is that the money exchanger, not the merchant, can make such a decision,” commenter L.K. Rigel wrote on a Dear Author blog post, where news of PayPal’s actions was first reported. “PayPal is, after all, basically a bank. So now a bank gets to decide what customers can buy or merchants can sell? The decision is only palatable because they’re cutting off stuff people mostly find abhorrent.”

When PayPal allegedly tried to lay the blame on credit card companies’ terms of service, Visa flipped a finger right back. “Visa takes no position with respect to lawful goods and services bought and sold by the people and the companies who use our payment service,” Visa’s Investor Relations wrote in a letter to BannedWriters.com. “We want to clarify that Visa had no involvement with PayPal’s conclusion on this issue.”

After Visa clarified their position on credit card usage (“anything legal”), PayPal’s excuse (“the credit card companies are making us do this!”) fell apart and they had to admit defeat. On March 13, PayPal announced an updated policy with regards to handling ebook transactions that “will prohibit use of PayPal for the sale of e-books that contain child pornography, or e-books with text and obscene images of rape, bestiality or incest… In addition, the policy will be focused on individual books, not on entire ‘classes’ of books.”

PayPal’s policy change represented a win for online retailers as well as for freedom of expression “This is going to be a major victory for writers, readers and free speech,” said Smashwords’ Mark Coker.

Related Posts:

50 Shades of Grey: Whipping BDSM Out Of The Shadows

Page 5 of 17« First...34567...10...Last »